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An overview of the LM microscope adapters
We offer LM digital adapter solutions for the following microscopes
Online configurator: LM microscope adapter for all digital cameras and microscopes
LM adapter solution for c-mount microscope ports with reduction optics (0.5x / 0.6x / 0.7x or f=55mm / f=75mm / f=100mm)
LM Macroscope 24x (15x and 11x) for Focus Stacking: Highest resolution without compromise
LM Macroscope 9x (5x and 3x) for Focus Stacking: Highest resolution without compromise
LM photo microscopes: the flexible photography solution for large sensor cameras!
Example application: Sand under the LM photo microscope
Example application LM macroscope 24x: European garden spider (Araneus diadematus)
Special mounting medium for microscopy, non toxic,water solved,light hardening,fast solidifying and drying,neutraldoes not make air bubbles,high optical solution,color protecting,solvent free,high refractive index
Micro Tech Lab advisory service: microscopy, digital cameras, high quality photo
Service: improving image quality by giving your microscope a professional check-up
Camera ranking for microscopy use
Camera recommendation for microscopy application
DSLR camera or special-purpose microscope cameras?
Image sensor: dynamic range and it's influence on image quality
Microsocope recommendation
The Zeiss Stemi 508 stereo microscope: microscope adapters for digital cameras (DLSR and system cameras)
The Olympus IX2 series: enhanced versatility for use in a wide range of application
Our LM digital adapters open the Zeiss SV8 stereo microscope to a new, digital world
Nikon’s SMZ 645 and 660 stereo microscopes in microphotography
With the help of LM Digital adapter the inverse Nikon Eclipse MA100 and MA200 microscope become fit for photomicrography
Capture exceptional images with the Leica DM4 B/DM6 B and our LM digital adapters
LM photo microscope with Nikon C-mount camera DS-Fi2 and control panel DS-L3 for measurement tasks, long-term studies and lengthy observations
Install modern camera systems (DSLR, system- or c-mount cameras) with our LM digital adapter on the Olympus SZX9 – a stereo microscope for industrial applications
Capture One Pro software: Tethering in microscopy with Live View for a large variety of cameras
Preview: The Nikon D850 – the new number 1 in our camera ranking!
Sony Alpha 9 – a camera that has everything you need!
Sony Alpha 7S II – a video specialist with ultra-high light sensitivity
Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5 – an interesting solution for long-term video recording at the microscope
Professional camera with full-frame sensor Leica M10 on the microscope
The new Canon DSLR EOS 1300D – a “microscope camera” with an unbeatable price/performance ratio
Canon EOS 800D DSLR - test on microscope with LM DSLR widefield adapter with planachromatic optics
Canon EOS 200D - practical test on microscope with LM DSLR widefield adapter with planachromatic optics
Various LM digital adapter solutions for many microscopes with the new Canon EOS 77D DSLR

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Canon EOS-1D X

At long last it is time for us to submit our hotly anticipated test report on Canon’s professional DSLR EOS-1D X camera. Since its market introduction in April 2012, it has been number 1 in our camera ranking, with a lead of 2,000 points over its comparable competitor model, the Nikon D4. We have now taken a closer look at the Canon EOS-1D X and, as always, have focussed particularly on the camera’s suitability for microscopy.

     

It is apparent from the very first glance that the Canon EOS-1D X is a weighty instrument. In terms of shape it is very similar to the Nikon D4, but that is no surprise considering that they both need to satisfy the same requirements. In view of its heavy weight (the body alone is a hefty 1.5 kg), once again we are very happy that we can attach the camera to a microscope and do not need to exert our muscles! The housing is made from a magnesium alloy and is, of course, manufactured to a highly sophisticated standard. The camera is designed for continuous operation, which is another reason for its heavy weight, as it requires thermal reserves. Otherwise, unlimited use of the Live View mode would not be possible, as the sensor would become too hot.

The rear of the camera has a very clear layout. Some controls are duplicated so that they can be easily operated in both portrait and landscape format. There are also two displays, which can even be lit at the push of a button when it is dark. At 3.2” (720 x 480 pixels), the monitor size is very large in comparison to other cameras. It is also interesting that Canon guarantees a shutter life expectancy of 400,000 exposures. We found both joysticks rather difficult to control. One slight criticism is that the camera does not have a rotating display, but then again, neither does the Nikon D4. It would seem that the main target group for this camera does not need one. And the fact of the matter is that if you operate the camera from your computer, then you don’t need one in microscopy or macroscopy either.

In the design of the full frame sensor, the emphasis has been placed on high speed and a high signal-to-noise ratio. The sensor is only 18.1 megapixels, but it delivers low-noise, sharp images with natural colour reproduction. Since the sensor only has a limited number of megapixels, these are especially large and can therefore capture more light, which in turn supports higher ISO numbers. This makes the camera suitable for documenting moving objects and for use in poor light conditions, such as in fluorescence microscopy.

According to Canon, the Canon EOS-1D X is only sold through Canon professional dealers and currently costs around € 6,100 (body only). 

    

The terminals are located on the side of the camera. The Canon EOS-1D X has a network terminal (LAN cable) and, of course, also an HDMI terminal. Furthermore, it features a USB terminal and, as an alternative, also connects to a traditional AV cable (in stereo sound). For studio use, there are also flash synch and remote control sockets. 

Additionally, the camera has an Ethernet port, which makes it possible to use the remote shooting function via the network with the Canon EOS Utility. The Ethernet port can also be used to save captured images directly to a server.

The battery is very large (26 Wh), and the charger that comes with the camera is able to charge two batteries simultaneously and also shows the residual charging time, both of which are very useful features. For our purposes, however, it would be better if the battery were a little smaller and lighter. When using the camera in a studio, it is sensible to have a mains power supply. The Canon EOS-1D X has two CompactFlash card slots, which means that there is plenty of memory capacity available. In the menu, the user can control how the memory cards are used (for example sequentially or in parallel). Unfortunately, it is not possible to use SD or XQD cards.

For our series of tests we used a Zeiss Axioskop microscope. We connected the Canon EOS-1D X to the phototube of the microscope with an Interface44, an LM TUST37C and an LM DSLRCFTC_Pro wide-field adapter.

We do not recommend that you attach the Canon EOS-1D X to the eyepiece tube due to its heavy weight. This could result in an unfavourable lever action on the eyepiece tube, which might cause damage.

We used the following firmware:

The Canon EOS-1D is designed for highly ambitious photographers, for which reason there is also no program selector dial. However, automatic program, shutter priority and aperture priority control as well as manual exposure are available. The camera offers many possibilities to individually adjust the settings depending on the user’s requirements. The manual ISO range can, for example, be set between 50 and 204,800, and even the minimum and maximum settings of the automatic ISO range can be controlled (100 to 51,200). While the Nikon D4 also has an ISO range of 204,800 in manual mode, in automatic mode it only goes up to 12,800, which is why it has 2,000 fewer points than the Canon EOS-1D X in our ranking.

The colour depth of the camera is 42 bits. The Canon EOS-1D X is identical to the Nikon D4 in terms of both ISO sensitivity and colour depth.

   

Particularly at higher ISO speeds, it is worthwhile using the noise reduction feature.

To save battery power, it is also possible to set the length of time after which the camera will automatically turn of if it is idle.

  

To prevent troublesome vibrations that may lead to blurred, unfocussed images, the user can select a quiet mode (Canon calls this “silent shooting”).

The Canon EOS-1D X is a lot of fun to work with. Another great feature is that, as with the Nikon D4, the Live View time is not limited. This is especially useful for presentations and lectures. The camera is also unbelievably fast; it shoots as quickly as a machine gun and also makes a similar noise, which can, however, be significantly reduced by using the mirror lockup function. If the mirror is folded up, the camera shoots even more quickly and with fewer vibrations. It is therefore possible to shoot continuously at speeds of up to 14 frames/second if the mirror is folded up. We compared the shortest possible exposure times of several cameras with one another: 

camera exposure time
Canon EOS-1D X 1/8000
Nikon D4 1/8000
Canon EOS 60D 1/8000
Canon EOS 700D 1/4000
Canon EOS 650D 1/4000

  

The continuous shooting function is very efficient. The user can select between two speed levels: at “high speed” 12 images per second are possible, while 3 images per second can be taken at “low speed”. The maximum possible number of consecutive shots is limited to 99.

The camera is able to show off all of its strong points in studio operation if the Canon EOS Utility software program is used to control it.  

Conclusion: 

This camera impressed us: it really is a top-class piece of equipment. Of course, however, it is overdimensioned for standard microscopy purposes, both in terms of size and price. Due to its heavy weight, the microscope used also needs to be correspondingly heavy and solid. It is extremely quick, offers unlimited use of the Live View mode and delivers very good, low-noise photos. It is able to show off its strengths especially well with moving objects (such as native sperm, water samples, microorganisms, etc.) and with applications in very poor light conditions, such as in fluorescence microscopy. In any case it is one of our favourite cameras and if you can afford the price tag, then you really should consider purchasing one.

27.06.2013


New LM Digital Adapter for:

Canon EOS 6D Mark II / Canon EOS 1D X / Canon EOS 6D / Canon EOS 5DS R ( without low-pass filter) / Canon EOS 80D / Canon EOS 5DS / Canon EOS 70D / Canon EOS 200D / Canon EOS 800D / Rebel T7i / Canon EOS 77D / Canon EOS 5D Mark III / Canon EOS 60D / Canon EOS 750D / Rebel T6i / Canon EOS 760D / Rebel T6s / Canon EOS 5D Mark II /

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Various LM digital adapter solutions for many microscopes with the new Canon EOS 77D DSLR
Canon EOS 200D - practical test on microscope with LM DSLR widefield adapter with planachromatic optics
Canon EOS 800D DSLR - test on microscope with LM DSLR widefield adapter with planachromatic optics
LM microscope adapters: Canon’s new midrange DSLR camera, the EOS 80 D, is a perfect fit for microscopes!
Professional camera with full-frame sensor Leica M10 on the microscope
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Tested for you: Canon EOS M5 system camera with a microscope
Canon EOS Utility 2 and Apple computer
Canon EOS 5D Mark II on the microscope
Taking photos with the Nikon SMZ18, SMZ25, SMZ800N and SMZ1270i stereo microscopes using our tried and tested LM digital adapters
Canon Rebel T4i (EOS 650D) in a practical test
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LM microscope adapters: We’re impressed by the performance of Canon’s professional-grade EOS 5D Mark IV camera at the microscope!
Controlling Olympus digital SLR cameras from your PC with the OLYMPUS Studio 2 software
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Using HD / UHD / 4k / 6k components in microphotography
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The Sony Alpha 7R on the microscope with the tried and tested LM digital adapters
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Canon EOS 5DS – the twin sister of the Canon EOS 5DS R
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Canon EOS 1200D - simple camera with a very good price performance ratio for microphotography
The Nikon D810 full frame camera in microscopy
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH4 with 4k video recording
fullframe camera Nikon D610 on the microscope
Nikon D7100 on the microscope
Canon EOS 70D on the microscope / laboratory microscope / stereomicroscope
Using the Canon EOS 700D (Canon Rebel T5i) for photgraphic work on the microscope
Canon EOS 100D - how does the currently smallest DSLR perform on th microscope?
PC remote control of the Nikon Coolpix digital camera in microscopy
An overview of the LM microscope adapters
Using a tablet (Toshiba runnin Windows 8.1.) for photomicrography
Which camera types are of interest for use in microscopy?
A useful item – battery adapters for DSLR cameras
Sensor heating in Nikon DSLR cameras in Live View mode
Sensor sensitivity (ISO) in digital cameras
Microscope or Macroscope Lighting: 2 IKEA-LED work lamps JANSJÖ for € 9.99 each
In microscopy, digital SLR cameras are the better video cameras!
Digital macro photography with “classic analogue lenses” at bargain prices
Photographing through a microscope eyepiece
Live video streaming and video capture with a mobile computer (notebook)
Time lapse shots with the Canon Utility software – using the timer function
Tethering software Sony
Image sensor: dynamic range and it's influence on image quality
The camera shutter - In photography, a shutter is used to control exposure time. It has a significant influence on image quality.
Olympus Capture Softwore use in microscopy application
Canon EOS remote app: operating EOS cameras by remote control via iPad and smartphone
The Canon EOS utility software via USB or LAN
Practical Test: Nikon D800
Testing report: Nikon D7000 in microscopy applications

 

High-end intermediate optics for connecting microscopes to:
  • digital SLR cameras
  • digital mirrorless system cameras with an interchangeable lens mount
  • c-mount-, USB- and firewire cameras
  • digital compact cameras and camcorders
[Further information amd prices]
 
Which digital camera works best on a microscope?
LM Makroskop 16x Convert your digital SLR camera into a professional microscope
Special mounting media  for microscopy

Tips and tricks to connect your digital camera and to process digital images
wing_drosophila

 

 Demo Pictures

 
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